Offline Seo Antivenom Review

SEO AntiVenom by Ben Littlefield is an excellent training program on how to help local businesses get more clients without having to use Google.

Whilst the Big G is undoubtedly important (think Google Places for one!), there are many other ways that you can help a local business to get more clients and build their reputation online, and I highly recommend that you get yourself a copy of Ben's training as he takes you through some simple but very effective strategies that you can definitely implement.

If you're a very experienced marketer, you might already doing a fair bit of what Ben proposes – but I've picked up some useful tips & tricks even though I've been focusing on offline marketing for 3 1/2 years.

Ben has promised that there's more to come as well – the most important thing is take ACTION (as always) regardless of how straightforward or something seems to be to implement.
One key phrase I hear a lot from marketing consultants is finding the low-hanging fruit – ie, find ways to help businesses do better those strategies that they are already trying to implement, but haven't yet got quite right, and SEO AntiVenom certainly falls within the category of training.
In summary: a great course for anyone wanting to gain some new clients without having to use the tired-old mantra of SEO services as the point of entry.

I finally left my 16 year old teaching career recently, to work full time on the internet. When the head teacher gave the traditional speech at the end of the school term, he said this:

"I'd heard about Dez Futak doing 'something on the internet', so I thought I'd find out for myself. Well, when I Googled his name this morning just to check, I discovered 7 pages of links with his name, so I guess what he's doing must be working!"

So how do you brand your business online?

The best way is by leveraging what the technologies behind the internet to help amplify the effect of your own content creation.

Most businesses now recognise that this is of paramount importance in the increasingly transparent world of the internet.

How do you want your business or personal presence to be perceived by others?

Increasingly, the first place people are going to find out about you is online. It's the natural thing to do.

In order to maximize the chance that they'll find information about you that you want them to know, you must be putting out content regularly, through many different channels.

I was shocked (I shouldn't have been really) to find a freelance job being advertised this morning, where the main task was to use "Astroturfing" techniques against another company in order to tarnish its reputation.

Online reputation management, social media management and content creation are now longer a luxury for a select few large corporations.

Every business must now seriously consider how it wants to be known.

Gone are the days of simple Search Engine Optimization strategies – we now also have social media optimization, reputation optimization, and so on.

So how do you go about leveraging these online technologies?

Here are a few simple ways to leverage your existing content:

  • Use Ping.fm to join together your social media accounts
  • You can also use Pixelpipe to perform a similar function
  • Join up your Twitter, Facebook & LinkedIn accounts to cross post
  • Use SocialOomph to time the release of blog posts and Tweets
  • Use a video syndication service such as TubeMogul, Traffic Geyser or Content Buzz to magnify your media content in many different locations

There are, of course many other ways to amplify the effect of your dynamic content online, such as the use of WordPress plugins which automatically publish your content to RSS feeds, Web2.0 properties such as Squidoo and so on.

In fact, not a month now goes by without some new and clever traffic-getting tool popping up online, and from the ones I've seen so far, they all seem excellent.

So, the battle is on: either you are branding your business, or someone else will for you, whether you like it (perhaps because you've outsourced your social media management to them), or not.

But you can't just sit by and hope. You've got to act. And now would be as good a time as any…

I’ve just been playing around with a very cool new search engine called Blekko.

It’s currently in Beta, but it has a lot of very cool functionality that, although you can find within Google if you try looking hard enough, it’s very easy to use.

Namely, Blekko (rhymes with Gekko??!) allows you to create your own slashtags and save them.

Also, you can delete searches as spam…something that is appearing within Google, I agree.

But one thing that Blekko gives you very easily that Google doesn’t is a very accessible and comprehensive analytics functionality, so you can look at inbound links, compate websites’ SEO, and so on.

Now again, Google does offer this via its own Analytics engine, and I agree with you if you tell me that Google’s offering is more detailed and flexible, but you can’t do market research so quickly, and much of the analytics intelligence isn’t easily available to the end user in the way that it is with Blekko.

So from my perspective as a marketer, I’m pretty much sold out on Blekko being a terrific marketing tool that I can use to help me when I’m seeking to understand marketing.

Probably the best thing I like about Blekko, and it’s something that is touted quite strongly in the demo video on the company’s website, is that being able to actively search for just certain categories is a snitch with the new search engine.

Foe example, if I want information about the Nokia N900, I can specify:

n900 /tech – for technology information

OR

n900 /shopping – if I want to buy one

(Actually, I’m only guessing about the shopping slashtag, but it’s pretty certain that it’s going to be an option!).

In case you haven’t watch the video above, do make sure you do, as it overviews much of what I’ve written here.

So is Blekko yet another example of a technological game-changer? I think so.

What say you (comment below!)

 

Summary of video

  • Incentivization only improves performance for simple tasks that have a simple series of procedures to reach the desired outcome.
  • Many of these procedures are increasingly being performed by computers
  • For high-level activities,

    when the outcome is incentivized.

  • Therefore, for businesses (in fact, any institution where there are people working on complex, high-level tasks) performing complex skills and working on creative solutions to challenges, another model is needed, otherwise the business suffers.
  • Cutting edge companies who realise this are now working on more effective ways to enhance performance, which enhance the following core outcomes:
    • Autonomy
    • Mastery
    • Purpose
  • Autonomy
  • is enhanced through creative time-out (eg, Google engineers are allowed 20% of their work-time for working on their own projects, which have produced Google News, Gmail, & Orchid, to name but a few)

So Where Does This Leave Performance-related Pay

In my view: On the scrap heap. Incentivization doesn’t work for the complex decisions and high-level thinking that are now the norm not the exception, for the majority of the workforce in any organisation.

For this large majority, performance-related pay harms the desired-outcome of enhanced productivity.

So why is still the default position for many businesses? Perhaps the answer is because in those organisations, they haven’t heard or realised that the "default" paradigm (expressed or just assumed) doesn’t work any more.

So why does this ‘default’ position exist at all?

At heart, every business, every organisation, every individual, has within them, a belief about how things are, whether or not they have been articulated.

In my next post, I’ll unpack more of why this is the case, and, if you don’t like the way things are, what you can do to change this "default future".

 

The Google Switch Report

Click Here to get your copy of the Google Switch Report

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The Google Switch Report outlines how to develop an integrated approach to traffic creation, effective lead generation and the creation of raving fans for you business.

Perhaps for the first time, we have mapped out before us a systematic approach to the whole methodology of internet-based traffic generation using different and disparate web technologies.

Some of these technologies (example: press releases) have been around for a long time, but how your business can effectively mesh them all together hasn't always been clear.

Well, now it is.

Jim Yaghi and David Schwind, the authors of the Google Switch, show how you can develop a joined-up approach to lead generation, with constant new torrents of traffic coming from pay per click, viral social media, forums, video and more.

These two experienced marketers not only tell you about the different technologies they use, but also how to apply them effectively, to maximize their impact.

The 136 page report is split into two distinct halves:

Part 1 gives a very honest and real account of both Jim Yaghi and David Schwind's backgrounds before they became successful online. In this section of the report you will learn things like:

why sitting in a cafe all day long led to a real breakthrough in Jim's business
how David went from bizop to bizop chasing the dream life, until one day he discovered the real game-changer

and much more, some of which is helter-skelter stuff.

Part 2 then dives into how David & Jim use the internet to get floods of targetted traffic, and includes top tips on the best ways to help build your reputation online using nothing but your mailing list and creativity in your writing.

In the first section, David explains how he combined Google Adwords, a press release, and his existing mailing list, to get 82 leads in a single day.

The rest of the report shows the incredible ways both David & Jim put together normally disconnected traffic generation techniques, and this is where the real power of The Google Switch Report comes into play.

Every section ends with a useful summary, and with this report alone, if you integrate their strategies into your marketing, you should begin to see a significant growth in your leads and traffic within a short space of time.

The last couple of pages of The Google Switch are a soft sell for Jim Yaghi and David Schwind's new course, entitled PPC Supremacy, where they will obviously be fleshing out the strategies they outline in The Google Switch, and reveal some of their most closely guarded secrets about effective lead generation using both paid and free traffic methods.

I highly recommend The Google Switch, even if you're an experienced online marketer, as it will undoubtedly teach you both new ways to increase the leads coming into your sales funnel and how to convert those leads into paying customers and fans.

For more information: visit my PPC Supremacy Reviewwebsite.

Blog Entry Summary:

  • Google Wave is a very powerful collaboration & project development/management tool
  • It is so next-gen that most people still won’t adopt it
  • You can embed Google Wave on your blog as a powerful, interactive & real-time method of conversing with your visitors

So, do you think Google Wave will ever become mainstream, or is its natural evolution Google Buzz?

Please add your comments below (just make sure you follow the house rules, otherwise I reserve the right to remove your post).

 

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It’s funny how things go around & come around; back in January 2009 I’d just started learning how to make money online with affiliate marketing, and I was excited about the possibilities of using the internet to earn money whilst I sleep, so that I could focus more time on my family.

I have to be very honest – I struggled. The biggest struggle was staying focused enough on one thing – there were, and now even more so, so many opportunities out there to earn a decent income, it was hard to settle on one thing.

I took a high end course on affiliate marketing, which to this day still contains a huge amount of valuable information, even though Google has changed it’s colors more times than a chameleon in the time between then and now.

Which brings me to now. You see, I’m still doing affiliate marketing, but I’m doing it incidentally, rather than focusing on it full time. At the moment, I’ve got other irons in the fire which can also generate income, but whatever business method I choose on the internet, I know that the best business model is one in which I do something once, and get paid over and over again thereafter.

In one sense, I’ve come full circle in terms of the methods I’m using to generate income online. As a business owner of a marketing company myself, I know how challenging it can be to generate consistent cashflow throught the financial year, and affiliate marketing provides me with a very helpful residual income to help pay for my ongoing business expenses.

So, how does affiliate marketing work? The nearest analogy I have, is when an actor or author gains ongoing royalties, or commissions based on work that they have created.

The methods used to generate income are surprisingly easy to do (and don’t require as much in the way of technical or computer skills as you might think).

The reason for the post title is that I’ve just stumbled across two young guys – who were teenagers when they made their first 6 figures online (in less than a year). They were both struggling undergrads (in fact, it seems like one was a college drop-out).

If you want to find out more about their story, click on the information below.

And in case you’re wondering, the links in this article are affiliate links for their product. If you’re new to the idea of affiliate marketing as a viable business model, and you’re considering ways to earn new income streams using the internet, without hesitation I would encourage you to consider becoming an affiliate as a way of getting started.

Click here Ready to make money online?

Ready to escape the 9-5 and make some serious income online? Then go ahead and check out Tycoon Cashflow. Adam Horwitz, and Derek Jay, two teens who made 129k in only 8 months online teach you how they did it. So are you ready to live the Internet lifestyle? Go ahead and visit Tycoon Cashflow.

I think you know the answer to the above question – this is a marketing blog, after all!

Before I give the answer you are probably expecting, I want to give you some history to search engine optimization, my reasons for being interested in this topic, and finally why I believe it’s so important to get this right.

Firstly then, the background to the article – how has search engine optimization (SEO) evolved from its humble beginnings?

SEO arguably started becoming really important at around the time of the “Dot Com” boom at around the turn of the twenty first century, when companies realised how easy (and cheap!) it could be to promote their products on the internet, compared to the more traditional off-line methods that had been hitherto dominant.

Initially, SEO was dominated by keyword stuffing of the key search terms, whether it was in the content of the article itself, or in the meta tags in the html header part of the page. A quick confession here: I remember putting several hundred keywords at the bottom of an article which were the same color as the background text. It worked as well 🙂

It really was a goldrush, with many pages ranking highly without much effort. The articles themselves were horrible to read however: the word repetition comes to mind.

When Larry Page and Sergey Brin came on the scene with what they perceived as a real gap in the market, they realised that search engines were lacking an obvious contender: search engine results that were actually useful.

From the get-go, Page and Brin developed their search engine based on the concept of Pagerank, which ranked content via backlinks. (See this Wikipedia article for more information).

Their Engine rapidly developed into the more refined ideal of: “give people results that actually help them find what they want”.

If you’ve read anything about SEO, you’ll hear the terms “Latent Semantic Indexing”, “silos” and many more…all used to described the way the googlebot likes to read your website.

But I want to put the brakes on here, and emphasize that although these things play a significant part to how well your website will rank with the search engines (and in particular the main player, Google), I believe delving too deep into the technical world of SEO can risk you missing the entire point of why it has been developed in the first place:

Search Engine Optimization is primarily aimed at helping the search engines (which use computers to attempt to find relevant content quickly) find your content as if they were behaving like an army of intelligent, super-quick librarians.

In other words, the search engines are attempting to mimic humans.

So, back to my original question (and by now, I know you know what answer I’m going to give here).

The answer is obviously, that you should be writing for your targeted audience and not the search engines.

Look at it this way: at the end of the day, if you can connect with your audience through what you write, then you’ve achieved your objective.

The search engines are trying to become as good as human readers at discerning what is relevant and good content.

So, if you’ve been to school and you can read and write, then you have a massive head-start over Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

They may be super-quick at finding the content, but you are always going to be better (OK, at least for quite a while yet, let’s be realistic!) than a bunch of dumb lumps of silicon at evoking the desired response from your audience.

And, finally, don’t forget, the search engine results only constitute a minority of the total ways that your website can get traffic (social bookmarking, communitiy websites such as forums, local directories, backlinks from authoritative websites being three other very significant sources of quality, targeted traffic).

So, if you’re feeling overwhelmed by the SEO-game, and you haven’t got the budget to hire a bunch of tech-heads to optimize your site, instead, learn the skills of good copywriting, and finding obvious places to engage with prospects.

In the process, your value to others will increase, both in real and perceived terms….neither of which you would gain particular credibility for if you were just focused on the ‘backend’ of SEO.

Comment below!

If you’ve been hanging around the IT world for a while, you might know that at one point (and maybe they still do), Microsoft adopted the policy of "embrace and extend".

Translation: take what others are doing, and make it waaaay better.

Often this involves buying companies (and I’m not going to "Microsoft bash" in this post by the way) and working with their existing teams to rapidly move a research project forward to its commercial phase.

Market place dominance becomes possible in an increasing number of meshed niches once a company establishes its brand (think of how many products Amazon now sells compared to 10 years ago).

Is embrace and extend good news for the consumer?

It all depends (of course).

Ubiquity is probably the elixir of life that a company will chase, either to its ultimate ruin, or its universal success, depending on the wisdom and tenacity of its leaders. Becoming a household name on the lips and in the minds of billions of people is a rare accolade only achieved by a few hundred worldwide brands.

In a sense, positioning your company to be some kind of service or infrastructural  backbone almost guarantees your immortality.

I say almost because of course, the environment which sustains brand  dominance is ever-changing, and successful companies ignore the ever-shifting sands of their surroundings at their peril.

So what about Google? Has it drank from this elixir, never to die?

Nobody knows that – but the evidence looks in their favor. Today when Google announced Google Broadband the world almost forgot that just 24 hours ago, we were told about Google Buzz. So, that’s two major innovations within a day.

Talk about ‘stacking’.

I freely admit that the actual rollout of gigabit home broadband is ‘only’ for a pilot group of a maximum of 500,000 North Americans, but nevertheless, Google is clearly straining (perhaps "steam rolling" is more apt) its way into becoming as well known as Coca Cola.

Think about this: less than ten years ago, the small startup had a cool idea about a new way to do to search.

Now even my 3 year old daughter knows the verb "to Google". And every internet marketer around the globe who uses the ubiquitous search engines knows the phrase "Google slap".

And we have the Google phone. And Google Mail. And Google video (aka YouTube). And now a Google Twitter/Facebook mashup that looks like it just might scratch in more places than Google Wave ever will.

And global(?) Google broadband soon…

And Google has its eyes on many other prizes that might well be within its grasp.

Truly embrace and extend.

Truly good for the world?

It all depends, as always, on the character of the leadership of the company. Are they motivated to make the world a better place? It certainly seems so. Google is treading its way to lead ("drag"?) red-necked dollar-driven, hard-nosed multi-nationals into a new era of social capitalism in a way that no-one thought possible – like a Moon-landing-4-minute-mile-water-into-wine extravaganza of "unliklihoods" all rolled into one.

On the other hand, how it all pans out depends, as always, on how Google copes with such universal acceptance. Will it remain able to hold to its open-handed philosophy of "do no evil" (as I alluded to in yesterday’s musings)?

Let’s hope so. Now is a good time to foster the entrepreneurial and innovative mindset like nobody’s business.

Or everybody’s business, perhaps.

Dez.

So What Does Google Do Now??

 

 

Google is in a tricky place at the moment – some would say a rock & hard place, perhaps. China, on the other hand, has all aces on the table, making it clear that it reckons it has the superior hand.

Maybe Google forgot some incredibly important things about the Tiger: it has a long memory,and it has a proud cultural identity that won’t back down when cornered, especially if it perceives a pressure to humbly bow before a force claiming moral superiority.

This may seem like strong langauge, but if history shows us anything obvious about China, it’s that it won’t back down when it’s cultural and national identity seem threatened.

As you may know, China already has its own popular search engine – Baidu. Google won’t ever be able to stake its claim in exactly the way it would want, so rightly or wrongly, they’re going to have to put up, or shut up.

In this case, perhaps shut up shop.

Google does face perhaps the most significantly difficult business AND ethical decision in the light of China’s diffidence.

It’s not clear how they can best behave from now on. They’re in troubled water with the western democratic conscience if they stay, and economically they’re in trickier waters if they pull out.

The latter option would certainly appease those of us in the west who can afford to take the moral high ground, but Google knows that China is perhaps the biggest single player to help them maintain and stablize their existing market dominance for some time to come.

“Do no evil?” Not so easy now that they are so big.