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The message of the above video is surely that with the advent of the MIT (Media Interwoven Trio) of Facebook, YouTube & Twitter (not fogetting the hundreds of socialbookmarking sites!!), there has never been a time in history when the people of the planet are so inextricably interconnected.

Socialnomicsaff link, subtitled " How social media transforms the way we live and do business" contains a message that every business needs to get hold of in this time of economic uncertainty.

If you run a business, and you don’t yet have a Facebook Fan page, Twitter account or YouTube channel, then you are missing out on a huge swathe of potential customers. You owe it to yourself to get online as soon as possible. Your savvy competitors might just get there before you otherwise.

Don’t believe that this is scaremongering hype either. Comcast, (US-based) after all, has seen a massive rise in popularity since it decided to meet customers on Twitter.

If you run an offline business, you should be there too.

Time to get a move on!

If you’ve been hanging around the IT world for a while, you might know that at one point (and maybe they still do), Microsoft adopted the policy of "embrace and extend".

Translation: take what others are doing, and make it waaaay better.

Often this involves buying companies (and I’m not going to "Microsoft bash" in this post by the way) and working with their existing teams to rapidly move a research project forward to its commercial phase.

Market place dominance becomes possible in an increasing number of meshed niches once a company establishes its brand (think of how many products Amazon now sells compared to 10 years ago).

Is embrace and extend good news for the consumer?

It all depends (of course).

Ubiquity is probably the elixir of life that a company will chase, either to its ultimate ruin, or its universal success, depending on the wisdom and tenacity of its leaders. Becoming a household name on the lips and in the minds of billions of people is a rare accolade only achieved by a few hundred worldwide brands.

In a sense, positioning your company to be some kind of service or infrastructural  backbone almost guarantees your immortality.

I say almost because of course, the environment which sustains brand  dominance is ever-changing, and successful companies ignore the ever-shifting sands of their surroundings at their peril.

So what about Google? Has it drank from this elixir, never to die?

Nobody knows that – but the evidence looks in their favor. Today when Google announced Google Broadband the world almost forgot that just 24 hours ago, we were told about Google Buzz. So, that’s two major innovations within a day.

Talk about ‘stacking’.

I freely admit that the actual rollout of gigabit home broadband is ‘only’ for a pilot group of a maximum of 500,000 North Americans, but nevertheless, Google is clearly straining (perhaps "steam rolling" is more apt) its way into becoming as well known as Coca Cola.

Think about this: less than ten years ago, the small startup had a cool idea about a new way to do to search.

Now even my 3 year old daughter knows the verb "to Google". And every internet marketer around the globe who uses the ubiquitous search engines knows the phrase "Google slap".

And we have the Google phone. And Google Mail. And Google video (aka YouTube). And now a Google Twitter/Facebook mashup that looks like it just might scratch in more places than Google Wave ever will.

And global(?) Google broadband soon…

And Google has its eyes on many other prizes that might well be within its grasp.

Truly embrace and extend.

Truly good for the world?

It all depends, as always, on the character of the leadership of the company. Are they motivated to make the world a better place? It certainly seems so. Google is treading its way to lead ("drag"?) red-necked dollar-driven, hard-nosed multi-nationals into a new era of social capitalism in a way that no-one thought possible – like a Moon-landing-4-minute-mile-water-into-wine extravaganza of "unliklihoods" all rolled into one.

On the other hand, how it all pans out depends, as always, on how Google copes with such universal acceptance. Will it remain able to hold to its open-handed philosophy of "do no evil" (as I alluded to in yesterday’s musings)?

Let’s hope so. Now is a good time to foster the entrepreneurial and innovative mindset like nobody’s business.

Or everybody’s business, perhaps.

Dez.

 

 

Google is in a tricky place at the moment – some would say a rock & hard place, perhaps. China, on the other hand, has all aces on the table, making it clear that it reckons it has the superior hand.

Maybe Google forgot some incredibly important things about the Tiger: it has a long memory,and it has a proud cultural identity that won’t back down when cornered, especially if it perceives a pressure to humbly bow before a force claiming moral superiority.

This may seem like strong langauge, but if history shows us anything obvious about China, it’s that it won’t back down when it’s cultural and national identity seem threatened.

As you may know, China already has its own popular search engine – Baidu. Google won’t ever be able to stake its claim in exactly the way it would want, so rightly or wrongly, they’re going to have to put up, or shut up.

In this case, perhaps shut up shop.

Google does face perhaps the most significantly difficult business AND ethical decision in the light of China’s diffidence.

It’s not clear how they can best behave from now on. They’re in troubled water with the western democratic conscience if they stay, and economically they’re in trickier waters if they pull out.

The latter option would certainly appease those of us in the west who can afford to take the moral high ground, but Google knows that China is perhaps the biggest single player to help them maintain and stablize their existing market dominance for some time to come.

“Do no evil?” Not so easy now that they are so big.

Back in October 2008, I remember listening in to a call with guest speaker Robert Kiyosaki, who as early as 2002 had seen the writing on the economic wall.

He warned of a global economic downturn so substantial – a new Global Depression, that traditional economies would not recover for many years to come.

Just as in an earthquake, where there are many aftershocks, so it is with the economic equivalent. So where has all the money gone?

Andew Cass strongly indicates that there is an unprecendented economic shift away from traditional ways of doing business: the online market place is continuing to grow at an unprecendented rate.

Is this then a contradiction: are the economies of the world suffering in an unprecended way, not seen since the 1930’s?

Or is there another story to tell?

There is an idea bouncing around the internet that:

More millionaires were created in the 1930’s Depression than at any other time in history.

Now I’m the first to admit that I haven’t check this statement, but probing a bit deeper might help explain how this could be the case.

The last global economic depression didn’t result in there being less money, but it did result in there being less money available.

That’s one view, in any case. What if it were true?

If it is true, then perhaps it might explain why more millionaires were created like never before.

Those who espouse the "Free-market" philosophy of economics would point perhaps to the idea that in tough economic times, only the fittest survive. Others might explain it slightly different language: only those businesses which continued to deliver real value to their clients survived and flourished.

The rest went to the wall, as they were either not good enough, or, more likely they were not flexible enough to adapt in the face of the massive change being thrust upon them.

Doesn’t this sound all so depressing, as we think of the unforseen knock-on effects of the last global depression?

In my opinion, it’s only depressing if we choose to see the game in the same old way. If we choose to re-align ourselves with the demands of the current reality, we will find solutions.

I’m not saying that there is a magic economic pill that can be swallowed to make things better, but I am saying that challenging problems require creative solutions.

It doesn’t take an economic expert (and I’m not one) to see this.

If that’s true, then, why is it that so many organizations don’t adapt in the face of adversity??

Why do they carry on as if it’s business as usual?

Here’s my ‘gut’ answer (and no evidence here – sorry!):

We don’t change because there is comfort in our present habits and routines and reliance on past successes to lull us into a disastrous false sense of security, summed up by beliefs such as:

"this is the way it has always been"

or, another powerful maxim that hacks and mortally wounds creativity like a unleashed samurai sword:

"if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it".

These, and many other well-meaning beliefs blind us to the solutions to the possible dangers that lie ahead.

Think about this for a moment: when was the last time you asked yourself the questions:

"Is what I am doing the best thing I could do?"

or:

"Is this solution the only realistic way to overcome the problem?"

What if Andrew Cass is correct in believing that there is no recession on the world wide web? What if there really are ways to survive this current economic chaos?

One way we can gain some clues as to possible solutions is to study what others are doing.

Here’s a name that you might have heard of:

AMAZON

And here’s another:

GOOGLE

You get my point, I hope.

I’m not trying to say things are rosey in the online garden. They’re patrolled by scorpions and black-widow spiders just like anywhere else.

But what I am saying is this: if you are in business (whether it’s as a home-based sole trader, or traditional offline brick and mortar business) and you don’t equip yourself with the latest online marketing training that works now, you will get left behind by someone else who does adapt, who is willing to change.

If that sounds unsettling, then maybe you need to re-evaluate how and what your business is doing.

It only takes an innovative entrepreneur to come along with a new way of doing things to wipe the floor clean before his or her competitors have had time to draw a sharp intake of breath.

I believe Andrew Cass is right: there is no recession on the worldwide web. But only for those who know how to use it.

Dez.

 

 

 

In a mirror?

Ok, joking aside – it is meant to be a serious question.

One of my children produced  this great piece of graffiti art as a Christmas present for me recently. It pretty much sums up my role as a high school teacher for the last 15 years- a fun-loving & zany person who likes being a bit off-the-wall (to put it mildly!).

But my 3 kids also know that persona is only part of the picture. It’s the same for each and everyone of us.

Who we choose to be is ultimately up to us.

We can choose to be grumpy, hard-bitten by our circumstances and regretful of our mistakes.

Or, we can choose to find something to be thankful for in what we experience every day.

You might think that’s just an idealistic thing to say from someone who knows nothing about the situation that you are going through right now.

Well, it’s true: I don’t know what you are going through. But I do know this. I can choose how I respond to what’s happening. I can create my own frame of mind- some would go as far as to say, I can create my own reality.

Which ever way you want to describe it, you have a choice. Sometimes making that choice is more challenging than at other times.

But I know that I can make that choice on how I see myself, and how I see my circumstances.

They present challenges. But they also present opportunities, and it’s up to me how I play the script in my mind.

Make the new decade one in which you choose to have courage and belief in the face of your circumstances. You have the potential to become who you want to be, and to do what you want to do.

You can make it happen.

Posted by Wordmobi

[flv:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmfbTd9C3j8 480 360]

The story of Jay Kubassek & Aaron Parkinson is one worth knowing: how they came from relative obscurity, to creating one of the most dynamic online internet marketing communities within the space of a couple of years. Jay’s background as a farmer & then car muffler salesman, and Aaron’s as a bouncer -are testimony that anyone with enough desire for change can escape the slavery of modern poverty that so many are becoming increasingly entrapped by.

Did it cost them lots of time and money? You bet. And probably lots of sleepless nights as they broke free from the chains that hold so many back from becoming truly financially independent.

What’s special about their story is that instead of just making themselves wealthy (which they will be quick to tell you would’ve been far less hassle and a lot easier), they decided to form a community where anyone who wants to have the opportunity to do what they have done, can tap into a nurturing training environment which provides an unmatched resource-base alongside teachers who are in the top 1% income bracket online.

Both Jay & Aaron continue to market their business themselves, so they know how things change as the changes happen.

Above all this, they knew that traveling this journey together has made all the difference. Since joining in with what they’ve created, I know exactly what they mean, and exactly what to do to make it happen in my life as I walk with like-minded entrepreneurs into the biggest opportunity in the history of the post-technology age.

As Aaron himself points out: if two teenagers can make a living online, anyone can. It just takes guts and persistance.

If you’ve got the guts and a vision for life that is bigger than you, click on the image below & signup to find out what Jay & Aaron have created.

 

Click on the Image Above to Find out How Jay & Aaron have helped change thousands of lives

 

Back in October of last year I posted an article about Robert Kiyosaki, and his recommendations for surviving the global economic recession:

“He believes that this is actually a time more serious than just a recession: a global depression is on its way, and we’re all going to have to face some very stark choices. I know what I’m going to do. How about you?”

Well, here we all are, and this is only the beginning. Things are going to get tough. VERY tough. If you’re in paid employment at the moment and you haven’t thought of a Plan B, GET ONE. Your town, village, city, region, will be unrecognizable in five years or less. OK, that’s a shocker what I’ve just written I know.

But we can’t bury our heads any longer. The roller coaster ride has only just begun.

Watch Robert Kiyosaki & John Seiferth talk about what’s happening. It’s blunt and a harsh wake-up call. But we need to hear it.

If you’re not sure what they mean when they talk about the ‘right hand side’ of the graph, buy Robert Kiyosaki’s book, Rich Dad2: The CashFlow Quadrant.

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