Robert Kiyosaki “Rich Dad” Advisor Michael Maloney has many years’ experience in understanding how the economies of the world have historically flocked to silver & gold in times of great economic uncertainty, and the current global meltdown is unarguably the most uncertain economic cycle humanity has ever been in, for the simple reason that, as never before, we are so interdependently connect, through technology (read: the internet).

So when Mike Maloney starts offering to throw silver around just because he wants to drive traffic to his website you know that times are getting pretty rough. Or about to.

The next massive shift, according to Robert Kiyosaki (and he’s been right so far), is in 2012, when lots of US-based new retirees cash-in on their non-existent 401k’s subsequent to some major government policy change. I can’t remember the exact details, but just Googling "Robert Kiyosaki 2012" might return some interesting results 🙂

Anyway, I’d like some of Mike’s silver – it would prove useful to some charities I’m wanting to expand my support to, so I’ll be pumping out  Mike’s videos over the next few weeks.

And if you really want to know what’s happening with the economies of the world right now, you should listen to this former Wall St investor who knows what’s happening on the inside: Visit The Wealth Transfer Conspiracy website for more details. (Full disclosure: That’s an affiliate link by the way, so I will get renumeration of you buy anything from there – the 20 minute video he talks about is free, however, and is an eye-opener).

 Mike Maloney’s visit to the Annual International Banking Forum proved to be a real eye-opener. 

His informal meeting with Moscow-based gold dealer Ivan Zhiznevskiy shows thst something is a-miss with one of the Russian mints that produce gold coins. 

The video above shows the presence of flaws and blemishes on the surface of several gold coins produced by the St Petersburg mint, and even more striking is the bank’s response (where the dealer bought the coins):

"You must keep the coins in a protective atmosphere, otherwise they will corrode".

Now, since when did gold start to corrode?

And more than that, since when did gold coins start to change colour.

Unless of course, they’re not pure gold.

But that sort of thing only happens in times of great economic stress, so, no problem, right?

Obviously you get my point.

Whilst other banks might not be so blatant about the fraud that is endemic in the world economies, you will no doubt be aware that we are living in a time of unprecedented wealth transfer.

It’s time to get educated and act: before long, the average middle-income earner will no longer exist. Pure gold or not pure gold. 

Back in October 2008, I remember listening in to a call with guest speaker Robert Kiyosaki, who as early as 2002 had seen the writing on the economic wall.

He warned of a global economic downturn so substantial – a new Global Depression, that traditional economies would not recover for many years to come.

Just as in an earthquake, where there are many aftershocks, so it is with the economic equivalent. So where has all the money gone?

Andew Cass strongly indicates that there is an unprecendented economic shift away from traditional ways of doing business: the online market place is continuing to grow at an unprecendented rate.

Is this then a contradiction: are the economies of the world suffering in an unprecended way, not seen since the 1930’s?

Or is there another story to tell?

There is an idea bouncing around the internet that:

More millionaires were created in the 1930’s Depression than at any other time in history.

Now I’m the first to admit that I haven’t check this statement, but probing a bit deeper might help explain how this could be the case.

The last global economic depression didn’t result in there being less money, but it did result in there being less money available.

That’s one view, in any case. What if it were true?

If it is true, then perhaps it might explain why more millionaires were created like never before.

Those who espouse the "Free-market" philosophy of economics would point perhaps to the idea that in tough economic times, only the fittest survive. Others might explain it slightly different language: only those businesses which continued to deliver real value to their clients survived and flourished.

The rest went to the wall, as they were either not good enough, or, more likely they were not flexible enough to adapt in the face of the massive change being thrust upon them.

Doesn’t this sound all so depressing, as we think of the unforseen knock-on effects of the last global depression?

In my opinion, it’s only depressing if we choose to see the game in the same old way. If we choose to re-align ourselves with the demands of the current reality, we will find solutions.

I’m not saying that there is a magic economic pill that can be swallowed to make things better, but I am saying that challenging problems require creative solutions.

It doesn’t take an economic expert (and I’m not one) to see this.

If that’s true, then, why is it that so many organizations don’t adapt in the face of adversity??

Why do they carry on as if it’s business as usual?

Here’s my ‘gut’ answer (and no evidence here – sorry!):

We don’t change because there is comfort in our present habits and routines and reliance on past successes to lull us into a disastrous false sense of security, summed up by beliefs such as:

"this is the way it has always been"

or, another powerful maxim that hacks and mortally wounds creativity like a unleashed samurai sword:

"if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it".

These, and many other well-meaning beliefs blind us to the solutions to the possible dangers that lie ahead.

Think about this for a moment: when was the last time you asked yourself the questions:

"Is what I am doing the best thing I could do?"

or:

"Is this solution the only realistic way to overcome the problem?"

What if Andrew Cass is correct in believing that there is no recession on the world wide web? What if there really are ways to survive this current economic chaos?

One way we can gain some clues as to possible solutions is to study what others are doing.

Here’s a name that you might have heard of:

AMAZON

And here’s another:

GOOGLE

You get my point, I hope.

I’m not trying to say things are rosey in the online garden. They’re patrolled by scorpions and black-widow spiders just like anywhere else.

But what I am saying is this: if you are in business (whether it’s as a home-based sole trader, or traditional offline brick and mortar business) and you don’t equip yourself with the latest online marketing training that works now, you will get left behind by someone else who does adapt, who is willing to change.

If that sounds unsettling, then maybe you need to re-evaluate how and what your business is doing.

It only takes an innovative entrepreneur to come along with a new way of doing things to wipe the floor clean before his or her competitors have had time to draw a sharp intake of breath.

I believe Andrew Cass is right: there is no recession on the worldwide web. But only for those who know how to use it.

Dez.

 

 

 

If you’re new to internet or network marketing, you might be amongst those who’ve started purely for financial reasons.

You might be in a situation of immanent or recent redundancy, or you might just be fed up living from pay check to pay check.

If that’s you, then perhaps the last thing on your mind right now is how you can use your money to help others, and that’s very reasonable.

But let’s project forwards in time, to say 6 months or a year from now. Depending on the business you’ve started, and your own financial thermostat, you could be earning 5 or perhaps even 6 figures per month. At the moment, this might seem like pure fantasy, and I’ll get into why it might seem like that another time.

For now, let’s imagine that you’ve been able to give up your day job, and money is no longer a worry. What do you do now?

It’s no great secret that we all need to have a bigger purpose in life. Most of us who’ve been around for a while know that. But what if you’ve not found a purpose, other than to have financial freedom? What do you do now? Do you simply aim to earn even more money? Will that help you find your purpose?

Clearly no. It’s easy to see that now. But if you put off thinking about it for too long, you could become amongst those who never discover a meaningful purpose, or mission, in life. Having a mission might sound strange, but really I’m just talking about having a goal that’s bigger than you – something that will excite you and create a sense of fulfilment in you that grows as you put your time and effort into it.

If you make money itself to be your primary purpose or mission – perhaps so that you can gain status or recognition from others – then you’ll be very likely to be in for a nasty shock down the line sometime. Money itself can never produce a sense of worth. In fact, the opposite can be true: the more money you have, the more meaningless your life can easily seem, if you’re not careful.

At first, this might seem a strange end-point to reach, especially if you come from a difficult financial situation, or a poor background.

But it’s important to think about now. One reason why this undesirable outcome can can occur is because money ultimately brings financial and personal independence. But that’s all it does. Wealth, on the other hand, brings freedom – freedom to you, and to people around you.

Robert Kiyosaki (of Rich Dad, Poor Dad fame), is well known for his pithy saying: “Money flows. It has velocity”.

It’s where the money flows to that is important.

Your wealth is really what’s inside you – inside your thinking, in how you deal with people, in what you think about life. It’s not how much money you have.

That’s why you need to think about a bigger purpose – something higher to aim for, that’s bigger than you. It’s fundamental to how human relationships flourish. Your true wealth can only really be measured by how many lives you positively affect, not how much money there is in your bank account.

You might be scoffing at this, perhaps thinking “It’s OK for him, he doesn’t know what it’s like being broke”. Well, as I write this, I do. I know all too well what it’s like. I’ve been there. I know what it’s like to wake up in the middle of the night suddenly, wondering whether or not I’ve gone over my over-draught limit on my bank account yet again.

Or hoping that the economy won’t affect my job.

What I’m saying is this: if you’ve haven’t done this yet, start thinking about bigger dreams than just the personal ones. Yes, think about the fun things you’d like to do with your new-found financial independence – plan on having fun, and lots of it (you’ve almost certainly got some catch-up time here!). But also think about something outside of your own personal or family relationships too.

The bigger your dream, the more wealth you’ll have to offer others.

That’s where real fulfilment happens.

Don’t wait until you have financial independence to start thinking about these things. By then it might be too difficult to change the direction things seem to be moving in.

I’m not saying you have to have your gameplan mapped out in minute detail now – after all, you’ve possibly got genuinely pressing circumstances dominating your thinking right now.

All I’m saying is: start giving your mission or purpose some consideration now. It’ll help you keep going when you get setbacks and difficulties like nothing else can, and more importantly, it will be an important part of the groundwork for ultimate fulfilment for you & others in the times ahead.

Back in October of last year I posted an article about Robert Kiyosaki, and his recommendations for surviving the global economic recession:

“He believes that this is actually a time more serious than just a recession: a global depression is on its way, and we’re all going to have to face some very stark choices. I know what I’m going to do. How about you?”

Well, here we all are, and this is only the beginning. Things are going to get tough. VERY tough. If you’re in paid employment at the moment and you haven’t thought of a Plan B, GET ONE. Your town, village, city, region, will be unrecognizable in five years or less. OK, that’s a shocker what I’ve just written I know.

But we can’t bury our heads any longer. The roller coaster ride has only just begun.

Watch Robert Kiyosaki & John Seiferth talk about what’s happening. It’s blunt and a harsh wake-up call. But we need to hear it.

If you’re not sure what they mean when they talk about the ‘right hand side’ of the graph, buy Robert Kiyosaki’s book, Rich Dad2: The CashFlow Quadrant.

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