I’ve just been playing around with a very cool new search engine called Blekko.

It’s currently in Beta, but it has a lot of very cool functionality that, although you can find within Google if you try looking hard enough, it’s very easy to use.

Namely, Blekko (rhymes with Gekko??!) allows you to create your own slashtags and save them.

Also, you can delete searches as spam…something that is appearing within Google, I agree.

But one thing that Blekko gives you very easily that Google doesn’t is a very accessible and comprehensive analytics functionality, so you can look at inbound links, compate websites’ SEO, and so on.

Now again, Google does offer this via its own Analytics engine, and I agree with you if you tell me that Google’s offering is more detailed and flexible, but you can’t do market research so quickly, and much of the analytics intelligence isn’t easily available to the end user in the way that it is with Blekko.

So from my perspective as a marketer, I’m pretty much sold out on Blekko being a terrific marketing tool that I can use to help me when I’m seeking to understand marketing.

Probably the best thing I like about Blekko, and it’s something that is touted quite strongly in the demo video on the company’s website, is that being able to actively search for just certain categories is a snitch with the new search engine.

Foe example, if I want information about the Nokia N900, I can specify:

n900 /tech – for technology information

OR

n900 /shopping – if I want to buy one

(Actually, I’m only guessing about the shopping slashtag, but it’s pretty certain that it’s going to be an option!).

In case you haven’t watch the video above, do make sure you do, as it overviews much of what I’ve written here.

So is Blekko yet another example of a technological game-changer? I think so.

What say you (comment below!)

 

Hal Varian, Chief Economist at Google, talks about Quailty Score & Cost per click in PPC advertising.

Key Components to your website:

These all affect your quality score

  • Relevant, original content
  • Be easily navigable
  • Quick load time
  • Minimum pop-ups or pop-unders
  • Be transparent about the nature of your business – how your site interacts with the visitor’s computer, and how you intend to use the visitor’s personal information
Google Quality Score

Google Quality Score

Adrank & Cost-per Click

Google determines your ad rank according to the Quality Score x your maximum bid; the higher the product of these two numbers, the better you ad rank and the higher up you’ll be in the paid advertising rankings.

Plus, you won’t have to pay so much to get in the number one slot. In fact, if your quality score goes up as a result of you tweaking your pages (as per the above checklist), then you could end up paying less for the number one slot compared to the person below you.

Cost per Click(2)

Your CPC = Your Competitor's Ad rank below you/Your QS

In other words, it really pays (literally!) to follow the Google adwords training on what makes a good quality score: When I first started Search Engine or PPC marketing, I was aware of the need to have a good quality score, but I didn’t really have enough experience or knowledge to know how to get my Quality Score higher, so I wasted lots of money.

If you’re starting out in Search Engine Marketing, Pay per click advertising, or affiliate marketing, John Reese’s new course is an ideal companion to the free stuff that Google provides – click the image below to find out more.

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