Picture this: I’m on holiday in beautiful hill country in the North of England with my family, including my 88 year old father-in-law who is wheelchair-bound.

We all decide to go and see a water fall, which is nearly 4km (about 2 1/2 miles) from the car park. As it’s very hilly, the journey is quite a challenge for me. But we make it, and are amazed by the powerful noise of the waterfall running down a steep gully near the reservoir outlet.

Then I face the journey back. I am now tired, it’s evening, and the return trip back to the car is more up than down.

As we race back, trying to get there before sundown (there are *no* lights anywhere, as it’s literally miles from civilization), we reach the home straight and suddenly the sun breaks out behind some high cloud, glimmering late golden sunshine onto the reservoir, and us.

The sight, as you can see from the image above, is quite breath-taking. And I find myself saying the following to my father-in-law:

“I’m glad we went as far as the waterfall John. I’ve learned in life that if you want to get something special, you have to do something special. And I know we won’t be coming back here, so I felt it was worth going the extra distance.”

Not only did we get to see the fast torrent of water, but we experienced the awe-inspiring sight as we completed the final leg of the journey back.

The takeaway is very clear: if you want to gain something unique, something inspirational or special in life, you must be willing to do what other people might not be willing to do.

You will be richly rewarded (in the best and broadest sense of the word ‘rich’) as you do this.

In case it has been a hidden truth: the finest treasures always require hard and often unique work, plus a willingness to do things that others would not do.

One final thought: during our 3 hour round trip and tour, we only saw one other family. Don’t be deceived into thinking that because there are few treading the path you are headed, that it’s the wrong path. It’s more likely to be the other way around.

If you be involved with marketing for sometime, you almost certainly have heard of Frank Kern.

Frank Kern is an Internet marketer who is famous for his surfing antics, but more importantly he has built an Internet marketing business over the last five years which is almost as legendary as his guitar playing.

At the time of writing this blog post, Frank is just about to release a new product called list building control. He outlines some of the principles that have helped him build a multimillion dollar business over the last few years in the following video: http://bit.ly/ds1CwY.

If you are a busy person like I am, perhaps you haven’t got time to watch the video right now. If that’s the case then here is a summary that I’ve done of Frank’s video which will help you understand the core principles that have helped him to go from rags to riches.

He calls these five principles the five pillars of kindness, and in essence the five pillars are all to do with giving people what they want, so that they move closer to their end goals, whatever they might be.

So without further ado here are Frank’s Five Pillars of Kindness that every Internet marketer should be focusing on as they market to their lists and provide value:

The 5 Pillars of Kindness

1) To know your subscribers’ desired outcomes – what they want to accomplish, and generate good will by giving them what they want.
2) Overcome their skepticism with shock & awe coolness: understand that they are likely to be skeptical.
People join your list because they want to get one step closer to their desired outcome. So lead with your best foot forward – give something of great value to your subscribers with something that will massively help them.
Give people the most valuable thing you have upfront.
3) Demonstrate that they can do it! Deep down inside, many people suffer from self-doubt which sabotages their success. It’s up to you to prove to them that they can do it…by showing them past experiences of others who’ve started exactly from the same point who have become successful.
4) Don’t just show them that they can do it: give them the tools with which they can actually succeed.
People are not on your list for fun. They are there to get help.
5) Motivate them to go further: make an offer to them which will help them accelerate their progress, and which will genuinely help them.
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Lastly, if you want to progress with your internet marketing skills but  can’t afford Frank’s price-tag (and it is still excellent value by the way), then  you have the chance to access free training every Monday (yes, I mean it!) from the community that I’m part of.
Yes, you will be asked to sign up for this training, but you don’t have to buy anything, and you can unsubscribe any time. Just click here to get started.
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If You Want Access To The Top Training, Networking & Internet Marketing Education Then You Couldn’t Find a Better Place to Be on 31 March 2010

Want to know More?

Fill in the box above or opposite to find out more, or if you’ve got the message from Gregg, Andrew & Michael (and you want the chance to network with these amazing fellas like I did last November in Las Vegas), then click on the image below to get started.

Dez.

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So What’s The 10 for 10 All About?

In essence, it’s about networking, masterminding, building certainty, expectancy, vision, passion, and most of all, hope.

Company directors Jay Kubassek & Aaron Parkinson come from humble beginnings, and they both recognise how important it is for any budding entrepreneur to see it actually working, for real.

In fact, all of the speakers you see in the above video have been through the hedge backwards to get to where they are now. They know the sleepless nights, the debt, the doubts, the fears.

But instead of being paralysed by the oncoming headlights from the freight train, they took action. They knew it wouldn’t be easy.

They knew it would cost them time, energy, effort and pain, to get where they are today.

But what kept them going, beyond anything, was a rock-solid belief in themsleves and the vision that they were, and still are reaching for today.

If you believe Jay & Aaron do this to make themselves richer, then perhaps you don’t yet understand the power of giving.

The Carbon Copy PRO community has been infected by the giving virus. Members at every level understand the power and release that comes from helping others to improve their lives, and that’s what the 10 for 10 is all about.

If you’re a struggling online marketer, or perhaps from a network marketing or home-based business background, then you will no doubt identify with, and possibly espouse similar values.

What makes Carbon Copy PRO unique in the field of the internet marketing world, is that the training, mindset and leadership development equips any entrepreneur with the right skills to make their business, and life, a success.

Want to know More?

Fill in the box above or opposite to find out more from Jay Jubassek, and I’ll get in contact with you too to answer any questions you might have.

Make no mistake, Carbon Copy PRO is the premier marketing training platform for any online business, and that’s not just sales hype.

Dez.

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Click here now to go to the videos: http://dezfutak.com/holygrailsuccess

I love the stories that Tony Robbins, Frank Kern and John Reese tell in the videos I mention in the above clip.

All three come from humble beginnings:

Tony was a janitor

Frank sold cash machines for shops

John worked in a video store.

If they looked at their circumstances they would have never had every reason to think that they were never going to aspire to anything great.

So what changed?

Very simple: Mindset.

They all worked on what goes on between their ears.

And they didn’t give up until their dreams were realized.

Their hidden secret?

Certainty.

They knew that if they just kept going, sooner or later their visions would happen.

By the way, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out how big the vision had to be be: BIG.

It seems that we all too easily believe the lie that life’s knocks are meant to help us rid ourselves of child-like dreams.

Whereas, in fact, life’s knocks are meant to help us find the diamonds in the tonne of coal that surrounds them in each one of us.

And the knocks must continue until the diamonds are found.

If you don’t relish the prospect of the pain that you have to go through to get to that point, then maybe that’s because you’ve let others, or even yourself, shape a small vision or no vision mindset.

But what if you chose to embrace the pain?

What if you decided to accept that the inevitable pains of this life are there to focus your attention on what really matters.

I’m hungry to find the diamonds. Sure, I don’t like the pain. It hurts.

But for every bruise to my ego, I see more clearly the diamonds being slowly revealed.

And when I glimpse at the diamonds, I see the most amazing colors, patterns and almost unimaginable pictures of what like could be like.

So I’ve decided to keep going until all the coal is gone and just the diamonds remain.

That’s the journey that Frank, Tony and John have travelled on, and now they no longer have to clean toilets, sell cash machines or work in video stores.

Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of good people who do these things.

But there are few who reach the summits of their lives, stopping short of the high views that life can bring to those who are hungry.

How about you?

If you’ve been hanging around the IT world for a while, you might know that at one point (and maybe they still do), Microsoft adopted the policy of "embrace and extend".

Translation: take what others are doing, and make it waaaay better.

Often this involves buying companies (and I’m not going to "Microsoft bash" in this post by the way) and working with their existing teams to rapidly move a research project forward to its commercial phase.

Market place dominance becomes possible in an increasing number of meshed niches once a company establishes its brand (think of how many products Amazon now sells compared to 10 years ago).

Is embrace and extend good news for the consumer?

It all depends (of course).

Ubiquity is probably the elixir of life that a company will chase, either to its ultimate ruin, or its universal success, depending on the wisdom and tenacity of its leaders. Becoming a household name on the lips and in the minds of billions of people is a rare accolade only achieved by a few hundred worldwide brands.

In a sense, positioning your company to be some kind of service or infrastructural  backbone almost guarantees your immortality.

I say almost because of course, the environment which sustains brand  dominance is ever-changing, and successful companies ignore the ever-shifting sands of their surroundings at their peril.

So what about Google? Has it drank from this elixir, never to die?

Nobody knows that – but the evidence looks in their favor. Today when Google announced Google Broadband the world almost forgot that just 24 hours ago, we were told about Google Buzz. So, that’s two major innovations within a day.

Talk about ‘stacking’.

I freely admit that the actual rollout of gigabit home broadband is ‘only’ for a pilot group of a maximum of 500,000 North Americans, but nevertheless, Google is clearly straining (perhaps "steam rolling" is more apt) its way into becoming as well known as Coca Cola.

Think about this: less than ten years ago, the small startup had a cool idea about a new way to do to search.

Now even my 3 year old daughter knows the verb "to Google". And every internet marketer around the globe who uses the ubiquitous search engines knows the phrase "Google slap".

And we have the Google phone. And Google Mail. And Google video (aka YouTube). And now a Google Twitter/Facebook mashup that looks like it just might scratch in more places than Google Wave ever will.

And global(?) Google broadband soon…

And Google has its eyes on many other prizes that might well be within its grasp.

Truly embrace and extend.

Truly good for the world?

It all depends, as always, on the character of the leadership of the company. Are they motivated to make the world a better place? It certainly seems so. Google is treading its way to lead ("drag"?) red-necked dollar-driven, hard-nosed multi-nationals into a new era of social capitalism in a way that no-one thought possible – like a Moon-landing-4-minute-mile-water-into-wine extravaganza of "unliklihoods" all rolled into one.

On the other hand, how it all pans out depends, as always, on how Google copes with such universal acceptance. Will it remain able to hold to its open-handed philosophy of "do no evil" (as I alluded to in yesterday’s musings)?

Let’s hope so. Now is a good time to foster the entrepreneurial and innovative mindset like nobody’s business.

Or everybody’s business, perhaps.

Dez.

 

 

Google is in a tricky place at the moment – some would say a rock & hard place, perhaps. China, on the other hand, has all aces on the table, making it clear that it reckons it has the superior hand.

Maybe Google forgot some incredibly important things about the Tiger: it has a long memory,and it has a proud cultural identity that won’t back down when cornered, especially if it perceives a pressure to humbly bow before a force claiming moral superiority.

This may seem like strong langauge, but if history shows us anything obvious about China, it’s that it won’t back down when it’s cultural and national identity seem threatened.

As you may know, China already has its own popular search engine – Baidu. Google won’t ever be able to stake its claim in exactly the way it would want, so rightly or wrongly, they’re going to have to put up, or shut up.

In this case, perhaps shut up shop.

Google does face perhaps the most significantly difficult business AND ethical decision in the light of China’s diffidence.

It’s not clear how they can best behave from now on. They’re in troubled water with the western democratic conscience if they stay, and economically they’re in trickier waters if they pull out.

The latter option would certainly appease those of us in the west who can afford to take the moral high ground, but Google knows that China is perhaps the biggest single player to help them maintain and stablize their existing market dominance for some time to come.

“Do no evil?” Not so easy now that they are so big.

Back in October 2008, I remember listening in to a call with guest speaker Robert Kiyosaki, who as early as 2002 had seen the writing on the economic wall.

He warned of a global economic downturn so substantial – a new Global Depression, that traditional economies would not recover for many years to come.

Just as in an earthquake, where there are many aftershocks, so it is with the economic equivalent. So where has all the money gone?

Andew Cass strongly indicates that there is an unprecendented economic shift away from traditional ways of doing business: the online market place is continuing to grow at an unprecendented rate.

Is this then a contradiction: are the economies of the world suffering in an unprecended way, not seen since the 1930’s?

Or is there another story to tell?

There is an idea bouncing around the internet that:

More millionaires were created in the 1930’s Depression than at any other time in history.

Now I’m the first to admit that I haven’t check this statement, but probing a bit deeper might help explain how this could be the case.

The last global economic depression didn’t result in there being less money, but it did result in there being less money available.

That’s one view, in any case. What if it were true?

If it is true, then perhaps it might explain why more millionaires were created like never before.

Those who espouse the "Free-market" philosophy of economics would point perhaps to the idea that in tough economic times, only the fittest survive. Others might explain it slightly different language: only those businesses which continued to deliver real value to their clients survived and flourished.

The rest went to the wall, as they were either not good enough, or, more likely they were not flexible enough to adapt in the face of the massive change being thrust upon them.

Doesn’t this sound all so depressing, as we think of the unforseen knock-on effects of the last global depression?

In my opinion, it’s only depressing if we choose to see the game in the same old way. If we choose to re-align ourselves with the demands of the current reality, we will find solutions.

I’m not saying that there is a magic economic pill that can be swallowed to make things better, but I am saying that challenging problems require creative solutions.

It doesn’t take an economic expert (and I’m not one) to see this.

If that’s true, then, why is it that so many organizations don’t adapt in the face of adversity??

Why do they carry on as if it’s business as usual?

Here’s my ‘gut’ answer (and no evidence here – sorry!):

We don’t change because there is comfort in our present habits and routines and reliance on past successes to lull us into a disastrous false sense of security, summed up by beliefs such as:

"this is the way it has always been"

or, another powerful maxim that hacks and mortally wounds creativity like a unleashed samurai sword:

"if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it".

These, and many other well-meaning beliefs blind us to the solutions to the possible dangers that lie ahead.

Think about this for a moment: when was the last time you asked yourself the questions:

"Is what I am doing the best thing I could do?"

or:

"Is this solution the only realistic way to overcome the problem?"

What if Andrew Cass is correct in believing that there is no recession on the world wide web? What if there really are ways to survive this current economic chaos?

One way we can gain some clues as to possible solutions is to study what others are doing.

Here’s a name that you might have heard of:

AMAZON

And here’s another:

GOOGLE

You get my point, I hope.

I’m not trying to say things are rosey in the online garden. They’re patrolled by scorpions and black-widow spiders just like anywhere else.

But what I am saying is this: if you are in business (whether it’s as a home-based sole trader, or traditional offline brick and mortar business) and you don’t equip yourself with the latest online marketing training that works now, you will get left behind by someone else who does adapt, who is willing to change.

If that sounds unsettling, then maybe you need to re-evaluate how and what your business is doing.

It only takes an innovative entrepreneur to come along with a new way of doing things to wipe the floor clean before his or her competitors have had time to draw a sharp intake of breath.

I believe Andrew Cass is right: there is no recession on the worldwide web. But only for those who know how to use it.

Dez.

 

 

 

For anyone that’s been around for a while, you have almost certainly heard of the legendary rise of Gary Vaynerchuk. If not, just use Google.com or even better – search.twitter.com.

Gary definitely has what I call SIX APPEAL.

So, what is Six Appeal, and why would you want it?

Well, here it is in a nutshell:

Six Essential Qualities That Are Guaranteed to Get Others to Follow You And Buy Your Stuff.

So, what are these six essential qualities?

You know the first three:

  • Know you
  • Like you
  • Trust you

It’s almost become a mantra that personal branding mentors, network marketers and home business owners soothingly send themselves to sleep with every night, and wake up feeling refreshed in the morning.

Seriously a minute: we all know there is nothing new in the KLT formula above. It’s not new to the world of direct sales or marketing. It’s fundamental to the way societies hold together: everyone wants to be known, liked and trusted, and/or be part of a community which reflects and shares those values.

What about the other three keys to Six Appeal?

As usual, someone (OK, it was me) always likes to come up with a simple "It’s as easy as A,B,C" system to help you remember this sort of thing, so here it is:

People want to follow others who are:

  • Able
  • Bold
  • Clever

Now before you shoot me down here, let me qualify where I’m going:

Able – someone who has a high degree of skill or experience in a particular field, in other words an expert. Gary clearly knew a lot about wine when he launched his web-business. Score 1.

Bold – someone who is not afraid to take risks and try things others have never done before. http://tv.winelibrary.com was an unheard of and untried phenomenon before Gary got there. Score 2.

Clever – someone who is able to creatively put together ideas and thoughts to make something new, brilliant, or incredibly useful. Or some combination of all of those, or more. Score 3 Gary.

 

So, by my definition, Gary Vaynerchuk scores 6/6. So he DEFINITELY has Six Appeal.

Hey – but what if you don’t like him? Well, not everybody like his raw language. But that’s who he is. Raw. Uncut. Not afraid. Gary. Himself.

So, if you’re an aspiring entrepreneur who is trying to carve out a niche, gain a following, become a leader in your own right, take a leaf ouf of WineLibrary.tv ‘s founder.

Don’t just be liked, known and trusted. Add the other three ingredients to the mix, because when you have something of great value to others, you’ll have the A, B, C as well as the K, L, T.

Right, I’m off to study Hungarian basket weaving like nobody has ever done it before. <joke>.

 

Dez.