If you be involved with marketing for sometime, you almost certainly have heard of Frank Kern.

Frank Kern is an Internet marketer who is famous for his surfing antics, but more importantly he has built an Internet marketing business over the last five years which is almost as legendary as his guitar playing.

At the time of writing this blog post, Frank is just about to release a new product called list building control. He outlines some of the principles that have helped him build a multimillion dollar business over the last few years in the following video: http://bit.ly/ds1CwY.

If you are a busy person like I am, perhaps you haven’t got time to watch the video right now. If that’s the case then here is a summary that I’ve done of Frank’s video which will help you understand the core principles that have helped him to go from rags to riches.

He calls these five principles the five pillars of kindness, and in essence the five pillars are all to do with giving people what they want, so that they move closer to their end goals, whatever they might be.

So without further ado here are Frank’s Five Pillars of Kindness that every Internet marketer should be focusing on as they market to their lists and provide value:

The 5 Pillars of Kindness

1) To know your subscribers’ desired outcomes – what they want to accomplish, and generate good will by giving them what they want.
2) Overcome their skepticism with shock & awe coolness: understand that they are likely to be skeptical.
People join your list because they want to get one step closer to their desired outcome. So lead with your best foot forward – give something of great value to your subscribers with something that will massively help them.
Give people the most valuable thing you have upfront.
3) Demonstrate that they can do it! Deep down inside, many people suffer from self-doubt which sabotages their success. It’s up to you to prove to them that they can do it…by showing them past experiences of others who’ve started exactly from the same point who have become successful.
4) Don’t just show them that they can do it: give them the tools with which they can actually succeed.
People are not on your list for fun. They are there to get help.
5) Motivate them to go further: make an offer to them which will help them accelerate their progress, and which will genuinely help them.
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Lastly, if you want to progress with your internet marketing skills but  can’t afford Frank’s price-tag (and it is still excellent value by the way), then  you have the chance to access free training every Monday (yes, I mean it!) from the community that I’m part of.
Yes, you will be asked to sign up for this training, but you don’t have to buy anything, and you can unsubscribe any time. Just click here to get started.

First Published in ArticlesBase

Why Integrity Matters

Integrity, as author Dr Henry Cloud says in his groundbreaking book of the same title, is important because “It affects our real results in the areas of our lives which matter to us most”. (Preface, Integrity: the courage to meet the demands of reality).

In other words, integrity is all to do with joining up the dots between personal character and the actions which flow out into the real world around us. Dr Cloud aptly describes how a right approach to dealing with integrity or its lack, both within ourselves and with those around us, leads to incalculable yet measurable benefits to all.

The pathway to producing people who have a firm commitment to following this path is one of the most important considerations in business and any interpersonal relationships.

So, what exactly is integrity? The bulk of this article will describe it different facets, or dimensions, leaving you with a very clear understanding of what you must do in order to realize and plan out how to foster a culture which embraces the values each dimension represents.

Let’s begin.

Integrity is Six Dimensional

Treating integrity as multi-dimensional allows us to map out each facet in a clear way. In reality, these dimensions are not independent of one another, but are inextricably meshed and intertwined within the very fabric of human relationships. I’m only separating out the different strands to help steer a careful pathway to make things easier!

Dimension 1: Establishing Trust

Being able to successfully follow through on what you say you are going to do is a significant part of trust-building. In old-fashioned language, someone who “is as good as his word” is a person who has a dependable consistency that others can rely on.

But establishing trust not only entails consistent actions, it also involves consistent behaviour. People trust others who they feel are stable in their response to challenges.

Trust runs deeper than this alone however, and it’s to do with the way in which we express understanding and empathy as we relate to others.

Cultivating empathy – being able to put yourself in the shoes of others, and being able to communicate that to them, is a sign of caring for others that I will examine in more detail when I look at transcendence, but for now, hang on to the fact that establishing yourself as a trustworthy person entails becoming a master of consistency as well as empathy.

Dimension 2: Oriented Towards Truth

This dimension is summed up in the phrase “actively seeking after and communicating the full reality of the situation”.

In other words, people who are oriented towards the truth aren’t merely those who don’t lie, but they have a tendency to be honest even when it might be painful to themselves or others.

The reason for this is that they understand that the full reality of a situation is the description within which there is the best likelihood of a solution that will work.

Dimension 3: Getting Results

Finishing well is the best way to sum up this dimension of integrity. Those who finish well have a very good understanding of their key strengths, and at the same time they recognise where they require the help of others to manage those areas where they lack skill or experience.

Getting results depends on the awareness that to bring order, to make things work, you have to invest your and your team’s skills in a wholehearted and skilful way, matching each person’s strengths to the different aspects of the task in hand.

For example, you wouldn’t ask the creative director of a company to audit the company’s finances. Likewise, your finance officer wouldn’t necessarily be most suited to think of new ways to market you company’s products.

But getting results goes deeper than just skills or talents.

Finishing well is a character trait of someone who is mature – they are able to realistically assess what they can and can’t do, they are not afraid to be vulnerable to their team; they have confidence in their own strengths and yet fully recognise and validate the strengths of others around them.

Dimension 4: Embracing the Negative

When was the last time you welcomed criticism, even embraced it? How easy do you find it to separate out the message from the messenger?

“Tell me the last 10%” sums up someone who is willing to hear the valid criticisms of others, knowing full well that there is the real risk that the messenger may not want to withhold their grievances in a kind way.

But a person or business that has learned the value of not only allowing the criticism, but actively seeks it out gains immeasurably over those who would want to avoid the painful realities that encompass the untold 10% of any given problem.

As Henry Cloud puts it so aptly:

No Problem, No Profit.

Facing into the wind of a problem is a tough call, but for those people or organisations who dare, they understand the fullness of the extent of the realities surrounding them, and are in a much better position to bring real and lasting solutions that remain totally inaccessible to others.

Dimension 5: Oriented Towards Increase

Cloud beautifully sums up this dimension of integrity:

You will not grow if you do not attempt to do things you cannot yet do.

Being oriented towards increase means that you or your organizations are on a continuous pathway to learn, to develop, to want to be stretched and challenged.

Muscles that don’t get used eventually wither, and the effects they were intended to produce eventually die through lack of exercise.

Likewise, a person or organization that loses that hunger to develop, to increase – to become more of who they are, eventually loses those skills and abilities.

Conversely, those who have an insatiable appetite to grow, to become more of who they are finish up with a greater sense of mission, purpose and direction.

They surround themselves with others, who coach, mentor them towards excellence. They pursue this goal by allowing others the permission to have an important say in how they are doing.

Dimension 6: Oriented Towards Transcendence

Lastly, integrity has to do with cultivating an awareness that there is a bigger picture that you are part of, that you as an individual or organization are a necessary jigsaw puzzle within which to fit.

This last characteristic of integrity is perhaps the hardest to achieve, because it involves a willingness of self-denial, self-correction and the ability to adjust to the demands around us.

As Dr Cloud puts it:

The immature character asks life to meet his demands. But the mature character meets the demands of life.

Action: An Integrity Audit

If you have read the above and realise there are gaps within yourself or your company, now is the time to do something about it. Don’t let the experience of the past dictate the patterns of the future. There are many good organisations which can help struggling companies and individuals make the breakthroughs they know they need to achieve.

The key thing, if you lack integrity in significant ways, is to take action. Failure to do so will invariably result (sooner or later) in negative consequences that could otherwise be changed before they look imminent and unstoppable.

You owe it to yourself, and those around you to make those changes happen.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/management-articles/integrity-in-business-1820715.html

About the Author

Dez Futak, is an online entrepreneur, business owner and teacher who devotes his time and energy helping others achieve the results they want for their business and lives.

Visit Dez’s website now if you would like to find out more about training in online marketing.

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If You Want Access To The Top Training, Networking & Internet Marketing Education Then You Couldn’t Find a Better Place to Be on 31 March 2010

Want to know More?

Fill in the box above or opposite to find out more, or if you’ve got the message from Gregg, Andrew & Michael (and you want the chance to network with these amazing fellas like I did last November in Las Vegas), then click on the image below to get started.

Dez.

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So What’s The 10 for 10 All About?

In essence, it’s about networking, masterminding, building certainty, expectancy, vision, passion, and most of all, hope.

Company directors Jay Kubassek & Aaron Parkinson come from humble beginnings, and they both recognise how important it is for any budding entrepreneur to see it actually working, for real.

In fact, all of the speakers you see in the above video have been through the hedge backwards to get to where they are now. They know the sleepless nights, the debt, the doubts, the fears.

But instead of being paralysed by the oncoming headlights from the freight train, they took action. They knew it wouldn’t be easy.

They knew it would cost them time, energy, effort and pain, to get where they are today.

But what kept them going, beyond anything, was a rock-solid belief in themsleves and the vision that they were, and still are reaching for today.

If you believe Jay & Aaron do this to make themselves richer, then perhaps you don’t yet understand the power of giving.

The Carbon Copy PRO community has been infected by the giving virus. Members at every level understand the power and release that comes from helping others to improve their lives, and that’s what the 10 for 10 is all about.

If you’re a struggling online marketer, or perhaps from a network marketing or home-based business background, then you will no doubt identify with, and possibly espouse similar values.

What makes Carbon Copy PRO unique in the field of the internet marketing world, is that the training, mindset and leadership development equips any entrepreneur with the right skills to make their business, and life, a success.

Want to know More?

Fill in the box above or opposite to find out more from Jay Jubassek, and I’ll get in contact with you too to answer any questions you might have.

Make no mistake, Carbon Copy PRO is the premier marketing training platform for any online business, and that’s not just sales hype.

Dez.

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Click here now to go to the videos: http://dezfutak.com/holygrailsuccess

I love the stories that Tony Robbins, Frank Kern and John Reese tell in the videos I mention in the above clip.

All three come from humble beginnings:

Tony was a janitor

Frank sold cash machines for shops

John worked in a video store.

If they looked at their circumstances they would have never had every reason to think that they were never going to aspire to anything great.

So what changed?

Very simple: Mindset.

They all worked on what goes on between their ears.

And they didn’t give up until their dreams were realized.

Their hidden secret?

Certainty.

They knew that if they just kept going, sooner or later their visions would happen.

By the way, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out how big the vision had to be be: BIG.

It seems that we all too easily believe the lie that life’s knocks are meant to help us rid ourselves of child-like dreams.

Whereas, in fact, life’s knocks are meant to help us find the diamonds in the tonne of coal that surrounds them in each one of us.

And the knocks must continue until the diamonds are found.

If you don’t relish the prospect of the pain that you have to go through to get to that point, then maybe that’s because you’ve let others, or even yourself, shape a small vision or no vision mindset.

But what if you chose to embrace the pain?

What if you decided to accept that the inevitable pains of this life are there to focus your attention on what really matters.

I’m hungry to find the diamonds. Sure, I don’t like the pain. It hurts.

But for every bruise to my ego, I see more clearly the diamonds being slowly revealed.

And when I glimpse at the diamonds, I see the most amazing colors, patterns and almost unimaginable pictures of what like could be like.

So I’ve decided to keep going until all the coal is gone and just the diamonds remain.

That’s the journey that Frank, Tony and John have travelled on, and now they no longer have to clean toilets, sell cash machines or work in video stores.

Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of good people who do these things.

But there are few who reach the summits of their lives, stopping short of the high views that life can bring to those who are hungry.

How about you?

 

Love is...Picture this: I’m beavering my way through a big to-do list in one of my businesses, and my gorgeous wife comes and asks me to:

  • pull up the floorboards so we can have a look to see where the damp is coming from that’s obviously cascading down our breakfast room wall…

Now the thing is, this has been on my to-do list for some while (OK, let’s be honest – well over a month [or is it 2?]). So it’s not exactly a sudden request – more a gentle reminder to have a look, as the damp continues to spread and might be caused by a pipe leaking somewhere.

So, I down keyboard & mouse, and pick up weapons of mass "Destruction In Yourhouse" (DIY)… screwdriver, hammer etc – which my wife has found in the shed that she tidied up by the way 🙂

And, I bang, bash & prod the floorboards until they reveal the dark secrets hiding underneath.

Why is this worthy of a blog post, you might well be asking?

Well, for many of us around the world, 14th February marks a special celebration, and here I am a day after the DIY, on this day-of-love.

As a bit of fun, I’d like you to add your comments below, giving your pithy & hopefully humorous contribution to your definition of love.

I’ll start the ball rolling:

Love is…

 

…doing what troubles your partner asks, even when it’s not troubling you

or (slightly better version as it’s specific):

…pulling up the floorboards on a busy Saturday because your partner is bothered by the damp patch on the wall below, and it’s been on your to-do list for too long already.

Now your turn!

(You have to scroll right to the bottom of the page to add a comment).

 

Why Integrity Matters

Integrity, as author Dr Henry Cloud says in his groundbreaking book of the same title, is important because "It affects our real results in the areas of our lives which matter to us most". (Preface, Integrity: the courage to meet the demands of reality).

In other words, integrity is all to do with joining up the dots between personal character and the actions which flow out into the real world around us. Dr Cloud aptly describes how a right approach to dealing with integrity or its lack, both within ourselves and with those around us, leads to incalculable yet measurable benefits to all.

The pathway to producing people who have a firm commitment to following this path is one of the most important considerations in business and any interpersonal relationships.

So, what exactly is integrity? The bulk of this article will describe it different facets, or dimensions, leaving you with a very clear understanding of what you must do in order to realize and plan out how to foster a culture which embraces the values each dimension represents.

Let’s begin.

Integrity is Six Dimensional

Treating integrity as multi-dimensional allows us to map out each facet in a clear way. In reality, these dimensions are not independent of one another, but are inextricably meshed and intertwined within the very fabric of human relationships. I’m only separating out the different strands to help steer a careful pathway to make things easier!

Dimension 1: Establishing Trust

Being able to successfully follow through on what you say you are going to do is a significant part of trust-building. In old-fashioned language, someone who "is as good as his word" is a person who has a dependable consistency that others can rely on.

But establishing trust not only entails consistent actions, it also involves consistent behaviour. People trust others who they feel are stable in their response to challenges.

Trust runs deeper than this alone however, and it’s to do with the way in which we express understanding and empathy as we relate to others.

Cultivating empathy – being able to put yourself in the shoes of others, and being able to communicate that to them, is a sign of caring for others that I will examine in more detail when I look at transcendence, but for now, hang on to the fact that establishing yourself as a trustworthy person entails becoming a master of consistency as well as empathy.

Dimension 2: Oriented Towards Truth

This dimension is summed up in the phrase "actively seeking after and communicating the full reality of the situation".

In other words, people who are oriented towards the truth aren’t merely those who don’t lie, but they have a tendency to be honest even when it might be painful to themselves or others.

The reason for this is that they understand that the full reality of a situation is the description within which there is the best likelihood of a solution that will work.

Dimension 3: Getting Results

Finishing well is the best way to sum up this dimension of integrity. Those who finish well have a very good understanding of their key strengths, and at the same time they recognise where they require the help of others to manage those areas where they lack skill or experience.

Getting results depends on the awareness that to bring order, to make things work, you have to invest your and your team’s skills in a wholehearted and skilful way, matching each person’s strengths to the different aspects of the task in hand.

For example, you wouldn’t ask the creative director of a company to audit the company’s finances. Likewise, your finance officer wouldn’t necessarily be most suited to think of new ways to market you company’s products.

But getting results goes deeper than just skills or talents.

Finishing well is a character trait of someone who is mature – they are able to realistically assess what they can and can’t do, they are not afraid to be vulnerable to their team; they have confidence in their own strengths and yet fully recognise and validate the strengths of others around them.

Dimension 4: Embracing the Negative

When was the last time you welcomed criticism, even embraced it? How easy do you find it to separate out the message from the messenger?

"Tell me the last 10%" sums up someone who is willing to hear the valid criticisms of others, knowing full well that there is the real risk that the messenger may not want to withhold their grievances in a kind way.

But a person or business that has learned the value of not only allowing the criticism, but actively seeks it out gains immeasurably over those who would want to avoid the painful realities that encompass the untold 10% of any given problem.

As Henry Cloud puts it so aptly:

No Problem, No Profit.

Facing into the wind of a problem is a tough call, but for those people or organisations who dare, they understand the fullness of the extent of the realities surrounding them, and are in a much better position to bring real and lasting solutions that remain totally inaccessible to others.

Dimension 5: Oriented Towards Increase

Cloud beautifully sums up this dimension of integrity:

You will not grow if you do not attempt to do things you cannot yet do.

Being oriented towards increase means that you or your organizations are on a continuous pathway to learn, to develop, to want to be stretched and challenged.

Muscles that don’t get used eventually wither, and the effects they were intended to produce eventually die through lack of exercise.

Likewise, a person or organization that loses that hunger to develop, to increase – to become more of who they are, eventually loses those skills and abilities.

Conversely, those who have an insatiable appetite to grow, to become more of who they are finish up with a greater sense of mission, purpose and direction.

They surround themselves with others, who coach, mentor them towards excellence. They pursue this goal by allowing others the permission to have an important say in how they are doing.

Dimension 6: Oriented Towards Transcendence

Lastly, integrity has to do with cultivating an awareness that there is a bigger picture that you are part of, that you as an individual or organization are a necessary jigsaw puzzle within which to fit.

This last characteristic of integrity is perhaps the hardest to achieve, because it involves a willingness of self-denial, self-correction and the ability to adjust to the demands around us.

As Dr Cloud puts it:

The immature character asks life to meet his demands. But the mature character meets the demands of life.

Action: An Integrity Audit

If you have read the above and realise there are gaps within yourself or your company, now is the time to do something about it. Don’t let the experience of the past dictate the patterns of the future. There are many good organisations which can help struggling companies and individuals make the breakthroughs they know they need to achieve.

The key thing, if you lack integrity in significant ways, is to take action. Failure to do so will invariably result (sooner or later) in negative consequences that could otherwise be changed before they look imminent and unstoppable.

You owe it to yourself, and those around you to make those changes happen.

About the Author

 

Dez Futak, is an online entrepreneur, business owner and teacher who devotes his time and energy helping others achieve the results they want for their business and lives.

Visit Dez’s website now if you would like to find out more about training in online marketing.

 

(ArticlesBase SC #1820715)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Integrity In Business

I had an interesting, encouraging and painful experience recently: I decided to do my annual accounts for one of my companies. It wasn’t painful for the obvious reasons, and it helped me realize the importance of the title of this article.

What am I talking about?

First: here’s the pain:

Some things I did in my company didn’t work, and I wasted money as a consequence, because of the poor decisions I made.

Here’s the encouragement:

Others activities I managed well produced a profitable result.

No big deal – every company has accountants and CFO’s to tell them this good and bad news, on an on-going basis.

So, how do these revelations relate to the title?

As you can tell from my last entry (Winners Know How to Lose Well), I’m on a journey at the moment.

I’m hungry for change.

Hungry, not so much for change around me (my circumstances), but more hungry for change within me.

I see shortcomings in my life that I no longer want to accept as an inevitable part of me. I look back at the last financial year of my main income-producing business, and see the litter of my shortcomings, and the successes of my character mixed together.

I want to let go of the things within me and within my business activities that I know that lead to loss – not just in monetary terms, but also in the effects that they have on others around me, both clients and personal relationships.

Is this a hard thing to do? You bet.

Do I need to do this? Absolutely.

Part of the art of life is learning to develop a keen sense of letting go of things that don’t work. I’m talking here much more about internal realities than external ones.

Why?

Because it matters anyway.

I’ve come to realize that if I want to be really successful in life (I prefer to use the term ‘fruitful’ but it amounts to the same thing), I must learn to let go of things sooner rather than later, because the wake of those decisions matter to me and to those around me in incalculable ways.

Why am I sharing this with you?

Well, it’s part of the nature of the fruitful aspects of my character to share with others what I know does and doesn’t work, because I know it helps others, and it also helps me.

This new decade started with a muted beginning, and only 12 days in many were devastated by events that literally rocked and destroyed their world.

But the reality is that there are events that happen within ourselves on a daily basis that can lead to our survival, growth and success, or our ultimate loss, if we choose not heed their lessons.

"Letting go before it matters" is really about making decisions to change and remove those things within me before the external consequences of those character flaws become so overwhelmingly obvious that it becomes too challenging to solve the problems that arise in their wake.

And in my business, it means deciding not to do things that although might seem good, actually limit my capacity to do those things that might become great.

So I’m on a journey. And I want to share it with those who are willing to walk with me in this process.

If that’s you, contact me, or comment below, and let’s begin the conversation together.

Dez.

In his groundbreaking book Integrity, The Courage to Meet the Demands of Reality, Dr Henry Cloud outlines what he considers to be one of the most important character traits that any child can gain as they grow up. As the title suggests, the ability or skill in learning how to lose well is that character trait. Why is this? What is Henry Could wanting to communicate here?

After all, if you’ve read the book or seen the film Apollo 13, you’ll probably remember the phrase that echoes down the corridors of time, cheering us on:

"Failure is not an option!".

The tenacity, brilliance, creativity and sheer dogged determinism to save the precious lives of the astronauts aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft will be studied and remember for decades, if not centuries.

So, is failure ever an option? What would 77 year old Gene Kranz say to Henry Cloud’s ideas?

Obviously I think they both have some valid things to say.

Here’s my angle on it: winners want to be successful in what they work at, they are not satisfied with second best. They want to achieve the best possible result for the goal they have in mind. They don’t want anything else. When winners don’t achieve their original goal however, they recognize that they have lost, but they know that they haven’t failed.

This is a very important point. Think about the last time you lost. Did you feel like a failure, coming down hard on yourself for not having achieved what you might have done had you just been that much smarter or perhaps if you had worked that bit harder….

It’s an easy thing to do.

But, and listen up here: it’s a killer way to analyze your loss. Losing is, after all, is as much part of life as winning. But in a real sense, failure is not an option, winning or losing. If Gene Kranz hadn’t managed to pull the team together, if they hadn’t been able to save the lives of their friends some 250,000 miles from home, they would have indeed lost.

But they would have done everything in their power to make a success – to get a win – out of what was understandably an almost impossible situation.

How they responded to their reality made ALL the difference.

They were tenacious, focused and determined. But they knew that success was not an automatic given.. Gene Kranz and his team of engineers, scientists and technicians also knew that their mindset would play a huge part in the chances of success, however. AND THIS IS THE KEY.

How we respond to the challenges, setbacks, lack of desired outcomes, makes all the difference to whether or not we are winners or not.

You see, I believe, we can be winners whether or not we get what we want. We might not always succeed in our goals. We might, if our lives are anything like the other billions of people on the planet, sometimes suffer hardship, pain, or disappointment.

But despite this, if we have the right mindset – if we know how to lose well – to accept that things might not always go the way we want – then we are far more likely to maintain our sense of destiny, courage, tenacity and enthusiasm for life. Whilst there is always something to be sad about in life, there are many things a grateful heart has to be thankful for.

So make it your goal to know how to lose well, to gain the type of thinking which has resilience and creativity in the face of adversity.

How do you do that? Well, the only way I know is by letting others into my space, either via my personal development through books and courses, or ultimately via the process of relationship with an important other or others. In my case, my wife, family  and my faith in God are the biggest influence on an on-going basis.

But if you have a different outlook on life, or are not in a close relationship, you can achieve a very high degree of success by surrounding yourself with a like-minded community of people who all share the same quest for wholeness (one of the six faces of integrity as Henry Cloud defines it).

Masterminding, finding a group of people with whom you can be honest with, and many other methods, can all help improve our mindset, our outlook on the world, our perception of ourselves and others.

Don’t make the mistake of confusing this with developing skills. Real winners know that the main difference between winners and failures is not skill. It’s our mindset and character.

As Jim Rohn famously said: work harder on yourself than your job. More than ever n the current economy, we know that a job is a fleeting hope for many. But real winners have the courage to face the reality of their situations and turn them to a new direction to create the circumstances for success.

They know they might not always achieve what they want. But they know how lose well.

Dez.

PS: I’ve recently started a new website called the 365 Secrets of Success Please do pay the website a visit and add your comments. Share your wisdom and insight.

 

Pennies on the parapet from Clifton College #haiti on Twitpic

Sometimes it’s easy to think that giving just a small part of what we have and who we are won’t  make much of a difference, and that’s certainly true if we act alone. Today, students and teachers at my school laid a total of 640 feet of coins,

Pennies (stretching 640 feet) on the parapet for Haiti from C... on Twitpic

stretching from the College’s Memorial Arch, to the chapel, and back again.

 

 

 

 

 Whilst each contribution may not have amount to any significant sum, the total amost certainly will.

The idea was the brainchild of the College’s charity coordinator, Fiona Hallworth, here seen sweeping up the coins after the 640 foot line was complete:

The takeaway from this brilliant idea, which turned into a memorable way to raise money is this: don’t discount your small contribution, but make sure that whatever you can give, find a group of like-minded people who feel the same way as you. When you do this, you can achieve amazing results that really can bring significant change.

 

Pennies on the parapet from Clifton College #haiti on Twitpic

 

Click on this image to see a wider range of pictures (uploaded to TwitPic).